Posts Tagged BPD

Nebulizers

Posted by on Monday, 24 January, 2011

Nebulizers are commonly used for treatment of cystic fibrosis, asthma, COPD and other respiratory diseases. The common technical principle for all nebulizers is to either use oxygen, compressed air or ultrasonic power, as means to break up medical solutions/suspensions into small aerosol droplets, for direct inhalation from the mouthpiece of the device. When using a nebulizer for inhalation therapy with medicine to be administered directly to the lungs, it is important to note that inhaled aerosol droplets can only penetrate into the narrow branches of the lower airways, if they have a small diameter of 1-5 micrometers. Otherwise they are only absorbed by the mouth cavity, where the effect is low. They also accept their medicine in the form of a liquid solution, which is often loaded into the device’s difuser chamber upon use.

Cleaning procedures for medical nebulizer equipment

After each use, disassemble the nebulizer as directed and rinse arts thoroughly in hot running water.

The mouthpiece should be washed in a detergent solution once a day.

The following disinfecting procedure should be followed twice a week:

Disassemble the nebulizer and immerse all parts in a warm detergent solution (Ivory, Joy, etc,) and scrub with a soft bottle-brush. If the tube, which connects the compressor to the nebulizer, is clear and dry, it does not have to be washed. If it has moisture inside or is dirty, wash it along with the other parts. Do not immerse compressor in water!

Rinse all articles in hot water and shake off excess.

Completely immerse all articles in a white vinegar solution and allow soaking for 30 minutes. Vinegar solution is 1 part vinegar to 2-3 parts water.

Rinse well in hot water and shake off excess and drain small parts on a clean towel.

When everything is completely dry, it may be reassembled for the next use.

It is also a good idea to dip a cloth in the vinegar solution and wipe down the outside of the compressor machine.


What Defines a child that is Medically Fragile?

Posted by on Tuesday, 13 April, 2010

“Medically Fragile or Special Health Care Needs Dependent”

To be defined as a special needs child, children must have special health care needs meaning the child must have a the need for specialized in-home health care based upon one or more of the following criteria:

  • Enteral Feeding Tube (nutrition fed through a tube placed in the nose, the stomach, or the small intestine.)
  • (TPN Dendent) Total Parenteral Feeding (supplies all the nutritional needs of the body by bypassing the digestive system, dripping nutrient solution directly into a vein.)
  • Cardiorespiratory Monitoring
  • Intravenous Therapy
  • Ventilator dependent
  • Oxygen Support
  • Urinary Catherization
  • Renal Dialysis
  • Ministrations imposed by tracheotomy, colostomy, Ileostomey, or other medical, surgical procedures.

Also, any condition that can rapidly deteriorate resulting in permanent injury or death. These children are commonly referred to as “medically fragile.” Typically, medically fragile children are infants under 3 years of age who are prone to hospitalization.

The following are a few examples of conditions that often, but certainly not always, qualify a child as medically fragile.

  • Prenatal exposure to drugs and/or alcohol
  • Congenital or hereditary defects such as spina bifida, sickle cell, anemia, cystic fibrosis, netherton syndrome, heart , lung defects.
  • Burns
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • Epilepsy
  • BPD – Bronchopulmonary dysplasia
  • Failure to thrive
  • HIV positive and symptomatic
  • Permaturity

With the on going advances in medicine, the quality of life and longevity has vastly improved for medically fragile children. Many medically fragile children are able to be cared for in “specialized licensed foster care homes” with mandated individualized care plans outlining the child’s medical care needs as opposed to having to stay in hospital ward. This home setting has proven to to facilitate improvements in the child’s condition and well being.